Recent Posts

Smell Something Funny? It Might Be Water Damage in Your Riverside Home

6/23/2021 (Permalink)

woman with brown hair pinching her nose with her fingers Most new homeowners are not water damage specialists, but the human nose is an excellent tool for sniffing out trouble.

How To Spot Water Damage in Your Riverside Home

Do you know when to be worried about a funny smell? Most new homeowners are not water damage specialists, but the human nose is an excellent tool for sniffing out trouble. Your nose is not the only way to spot water damage in your new home. SERVPRO technicians are certified at Institute of Inspection Cleaning and Restoration Certification (IICRC) and can help handle any moisture problems you may discover after moving in. 

The sooner you notice a problem, the sooner you can call us to help mitigate ongoing damages. With summer in full session in Riverside, some water damage will be easier to spot. When you notice a problem, a highly trained SERVPRO professional can assess the extent of your damages. We can use our specialized equipment to remedy the issue fast. 

What should you keep an eye out for when cleaning your Riverside home? Start at the top. When looking for roof damages, obvious water stains aren't the only problem. Swollen insulation is usually an indication of water retention. Check your flashing (where the roof meets the walls) for cracks and look for missing shingles as well as more obvious signs like holes. Look at door frames and molding. Unusual stains or dark spots on the walls can mean trouble. 

Inside, make sure you check your appliances after you move in to be certain they are not leaking where you cannot see easily behind them. Cracked hoses and loose connections can be tricky. Ripples, buckling, and changes in texture can tell you the flooring has a water problem. Remember to trust your nose. If it smells wrong, it probably is. 

Outside water damages and mold are often caused by improper drainage. Check your spouts to see that they are clear and make sure you do not have water pooling around the foundation of your new home. At the first sign of damage, you can contact SERVPRO of West Riverside City.

No one wants to find water damages in their new home this spring. If you do, SERVPRO of West Riverside City is available at:

951-351-8033 7 days a week 24 hours a day.

We can make things “Like it never even happened,” so you can relax in your new house.

How To Restore Electronics After A Riverside Business Fire

6/21/2021 (Permalink)

black phone and keyboard with smoke and orange yellow flames An electrical fire doesn’t have to be the end of your electronics. If you react quickly, most electronics not directly subjected to heat can be saved.

Having an electrical fire in your business is bad news. Damage to your electric wiring, appliances and electronics can be extremely difficult to repair. Soot and smoke damage have incredible penetration, and it only takes a minuscule amount in the wrong place in modern electronics to destroy an entire device.

Smoke Hates Electronics 

Computers and complicated electronics have extremely dense circuit boards. The space between conductors is precisely calculated to be the least distance possible. Unfortunately, this means it takes very little to create a short circuit.

There are three main dangers to electronics from the smoke:

  • A black, oily film
  • Polarized smoke
  • Acid in the soot

Smoke Eats Boards 

Smoke from an electrical fire is a complicated substance and depends on the materials burned and the degree of heat. However, it always contains some soot and oil. If the material wasn’t well-combusted, the amount of soot and smoke increases enormously.

While the oil and soot can short out your circuit board, the acids in the smoke will start to dissolve the board itself. This can loosen connections and allow tracings to migrate slightly, causing spikes in impedances and loose connections that lead to computer failures.

Computer Cleanup Is Usually the Worst 

Unlike most electronic devices, most computers have fans that actively draw in air from the room to cool the CPU and graphics processor. This means the smoke is being pulled in, and it makes computer cleanup extremely difficult.

Professional electronics restoration companies have special solvents that can often save a computer, but it should be removed from power before receiving smoke damage. If you can safely do so before evacuating, you or a manager should shut off the breakers. It makes it safer for the firefighters, too.

An electrical fire doesn’t have to be the end of your electronics. If you react quickly and hire the right experts, most electronics not directly subjected to heat can be saved. Either way, SERVPRO will return your business to “Like it never even happened.”

Are Your Pets Prepared for Riverside Disasters? June is National Pet Preparedness Month!

6/16/2021 (Permalink)

a dog with a green tshirt on, black and green duffle bag and red emergency bag Riverside can experience disasters from earthquakes, wildfires, flooding & winds. If you had to evacuate are you prepared with a plan for your pet?

June is National Pet Preparedness Month

In Riverside, CA we can experience disasters from earthquakes, wildfires, flooding, and excessive winds.  If you had to evacuate are you prepared with a plan for your pet? 

Ready.gov has provided these tips to help pet owners during a disaster. 

Your pets are an important member of your family, so they need to be included in your family’s emergency plan. To prepare for the unexpected follow these tips with your pets in mind:

  1. Make a plan.
  2. Build an emergency kit.
  3. Stay informed.

Make a Plan

If you have a plan in place for you and your pets, you will likely encounter less difficulty, stress and worry when you need to make a decision during an emergency. If local officials ask you to evacuate, that means your pet should evacuate too. If you leave your pets behind, they may end up lost, injured or worse.

Things to include in your plan:

  • Have an evacuation plan for your pet. Many public shelters and hotels do not allow pets inside. Know a safe place where you can take your pets before disasters and emergencies happen.
  • Develop a buddy system. Plan with neighbors, friends or relatives to make sure that someone is available to care for or evacuate your pets if you are unable to do so.
  • Have your pet microchipped. Make sure to keep your address and phone number up-to-date and include contact information for an emergency contact outside of your immediate area.
  • Contact your local emergency management office, animal shelter or animal control office to get additional advice and information if you’re unsure how to care for your pet in case of an emergency.

Build a Kit for Your Pet

Just as you do with your family’s emergency supply kit, think first about the basics for survival, such as food and water. Have two kits, one larger kit if you are sheltering in place and one lightweight version for if you need to evacuate.  Review your kits regularly to ensure that their contents, especially foods and medicines, are fresh.

Here are some items you may want to include in an emergency kit for your pet:

  • Food. Keep several days’ supply of food in an airtight, waterproof container.
  • Water. Store a water bowl and several days’ supply of water.
  • Medicine. Keep an extra supply of the medicine your pet takes on a regular basis in a waterproof container.
  • First aid kit. Talk to your veterinarian about what is most appropriate for your pet’s emergency medical needs.
  • Collar with ID tag and a harness or leash. Include a backup leash, collar and ID tag. Have copies of your pet’s registration information and other relevant documents in a waterproof container and available electronically.
  • Traveling bag, crate or sturdy carrier, ideally one for each pet.
  • Grooming items. Pet shampoo, conditioner and other items, in case your pet needs some cleaning up.
  • Sanitation needs. Include pet litter and litter box (if appropriate), newspapers, paper towels, plastic trash bags and household chlorine bleach to provide for your pet’s sanitation needs.
  • A picture of you and your pet together. If you become separated from your pet during an emergency, a picture of you and your pet together will help you document ownership and allow others to assist you in identifying your pet.
  • Familiar items. Put favorite toys, treats or bedding in your kit. Familiar items can help reduce stress for your pet.

In addition to the tips above:

  • Ensure all animals have some form of identification.
  • Evacuate animals earlier, whenever possible. Map out primary and secondary routes in advance.
  • Make available vehicles and trailers needed for transporting and supporting each type of animal. Also make available experienced handlers and drivers.
  • Ensure destinations have food, water, veterinary care and handling equipment.
  • If evacuation is not possible, animal owners must decide whether to move large animals to a barn or turn them loose outside.

Stay Informed

Being prepared and staying informed of current conditions. Here are some ways you can stay informed:

  • Pay attention to wireless emergency alerts for local alerts and warnings sent by state and local public safety officials.
  • Listen to local officials when told to evacuate or shelter in place.
  • Download the FEMA app and get weather alerts from the National Weather Service, for up to five different locations anywhere in the United States.
  • Always bring pets indoors at the first sign or warning of a storm or disaster.

Many public shelters and hotels do not allow pets inside, so plan ahead.

  • Know a safe place where you can take your pets before disasters and emergencies happen.
  • Plan with neighbors, friends or relatives to make sure that someone is available to care for or evacuate your pets if you are unable to do so.
  • Contact your local emergency management office, animal shelter, or animal control office if you’re unsure how to take care of your pet during an emergency.
  • Have your pets microchipped in case they get lost.
  • Check out  BringFido for pet friendly hotels in Riverside

Excessive Heat Wave Warning in Riverside County- Tips from Ready.gov

6/14/2021 (Permalink)

red and orange background with orange sun and thermometer reaching 100's Riverside Residents should take precautions during a heat wave!

An excessive heat warning will be in effect in the Riverside metropolitan area and the Riverside County mountains starting at 10 a.m. Tuesday and lasting through 9 p.m. Saturday. 

Temperatures in the Riverside area are expected to peak at 110 on Tuesday, then reach 109 on Wednesday, advised forecasters.

Ready.gov has outlined some tip to help keep safe from dehydration, heatstroke and keeping our families and pets safe. 

Extreme heat is a period of high heat and humidity with temperatures above 90 degrees for at least two to three days. In extreme heat your body works extra hard to maintain a normal temperature, which can lead to death. In fact, extreme heat is responsible for the highest number of annual deaths among all weather-related hazards.

Remember:

  • Extreme heat can occur quickly and without warning.
  • Older adults, children and sick or overweight individuals are at greater risk from extreme heat.
  • Humidity increases the feeling of heat as measured by a heat index.

IF YOU ARE UNDER AN EXTREME HEAT WARNING:

  • Find air conditioning.
  • Avoid strenuous activities.
  • Wear light clothing.
  • Check on family members and neighbors.
  • Drink plenty of fluids.
  • Watch for heat cramps, heat exhaustion and heat stroke.
  • Never leave people or pets in a closed car.

HOW TO STAY SAFE WHEN EXTREME HEAT THREATENS

Prepare NOW

Find places in your community where you can go to get cool.

Try to keep your home cool:

  • Do not rely on a fan as your primary cooling device.  
  • Cover windows with drapes or shades.
  • Weather-strip doors and windows.
  • Use window reflectors such as aluminum foil-covered cardboard to reflect heat back outside.
  • Add insulation to keep the heat out.
  • Use a powered attic ventilator, or attic fan, to regulate the heat level of a building’s attic by clearing hot air.
  • Install window air conditioners and insulate around them.
  • Learn to recognize the signs of heat illness. For more information visit: www.cdc.gov/disasters/extremeheat/warning.html

Be Safe DURING

Never leave a child, adult, or animal alone inside a vehicle on a warm day.  Find places with air conditioning. Libraries, shopping malls, and community centers can be a cool place to beat the heat. Stay informed and check with local authorities about possible closures prior to going to cooling centers.

  • If air conditioning is not available in your home:
  • Contact Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP) for help.
  • Contact your local health department or locate an air-conditioned shelter in your area.
  • Spend some time at a shopping mall or public library- even a few hours spent in air conditioning can help. 
  • Your community may set up emergency alternatives for cooling centers, such as using parked air-conditioned buses or movie theaters, as normal cooling centers may not have enough space for physical distancing. Pay attention to guidance from local officials to determine where the nearest cooling center is.
  • Take cool showers or baths.
  • Don’t rely solely on fans to keep you cool. While electric fans might provide some comfort, when temperatures are really hot, they won’t prevent heat-related illness.
  • Use your stove and oven less to maintain a cooler temperature in your home.
  • If you’re outside, find shade. Wear a hat wide enough to protect your face.
  • Wear loose, lightweight, light-colored clothing.
  • Drink plenty of fluids to stay hydrated. If you or someone you care for is on a special diet, ask a doctor what would be best.
  • Do not use electric fans when the temperature outside is more than 95 degrees. You could increase the risk of heat-related illness. Fans create air flow and a false sense of comfort, but do not reduce body temperature.
  • Avoid high-energy activities outdoors. Avoid working outdoors during the midday heat, if possible.
  • Check yourself, family members, and neighbors for signs of heat-related illness
  • Engage virtually with your community through video and phone calls. Know that it’s normal to feel anxious or stressed. Take care of your body and talk to someone if you are feeling upset.

Recognize and Respond

Know the signs of heat-related illnesses and ways to respond. At-risk populations for heat-related illness include older individuals and those with underlying health conditions. Know how to protect individuals especially at risk from extreme heat events.

If you are sick and need medical attention, contact your healthcare provider for advice and shelter in place, if you can. If you are experiencing a medical emergency, call 9-1-1.

HEAT CRAMPS

  • Signs: Muscle pains or spasms in the stomach, arms or legs
  • Actions: Go to a cooler location. Remove excess clothing. Take sips of cool sports drinks with salt and sugar. If you are sick and need medical attention, call your healthcare provider first. Follow your healthcare provider’s instructions about whether you should go to the hospital or cooler location yourself, as you may be putting others or yourself in greater risk for contracting COVID-19. If cramps last more than an hour, seek medical attention.

HEAT EXHAUSTION

  • Signs: Heavy sweating, paleness, muscle cramps, tiredness, weakness, dizziness, headache, fainting, nausea, vomiting
  • Actions: Go to an air-conditioned place and lie down. Loosen or remove clothing. Take a cool bath. Take sips of cool sports drinks with salt and sugar. Call your healthcare provider if symptoms get worse or last more than an hour.

HEAT STROKE

  • Signs: 
    • Extremely high body temperature (above 103 degrees) taken orally 
    • Red, hot and dry skin with no sweat
    • Rapid, strong pulse
    • Dizziness, confusion or unconsciousness
    • Actions: Call 9-1-1 or get the person to a hospital immediately. Cool down with whatever methods are available until medical help arrives.

Riverside County has identified cooling centers during this heatwave, click the link to find one near you.

https://www.capriverside.org/cool-centers

In the 92503 area code here are three centers you can go to during the heat of day:

  • La Sierra Senior Center
  • Arlanza Community Center Bryant Park
  • Janet Goeske Center

City of Riverside Disaster Preparedness

5/31/2021 (Permalink)

logo for city of riverside fire department in red and black lettering The City of Riverside is actively coordinating the City's response to disasters & assisting residents to prepare major events.

If you are a Riverside resident, we captured some important questions and links to understand how the City of Riverside is managing emergency disaster preparedness.  See below for important pieces of information.  Be prepared! Click links below for more information.

Emergency Management Disaster Preparedness

The City of Riverside's Emergency Management Office is actively coordinating the City's response to disasters as well as assisting residents to prepare for major events such as earthquakes, floods, hazardous material spills, plane crashes, train derailments, Africanized honey bees, and civil unrest.

Frequently Asked Questions

What is an "EOC?"

The Emergency Operation Center (EOC) is a secure facility where City department heads are able to work in the event of a large disaster. The facility provides centralization of City response to major events. The EOC allows for City departments to work closely together to make recovery more efficient for the community.

Does the City have a disaster plan?

Yes. The City is required by state and federal regulation to have a response and recovery plan. This plan covers everything from earthquakes and plane crashes to fires and flooding. This plan is maintained by the Emergency Manager and is continuously updated. A major update of the plan is done every five years. The newly revised plan is available to view at Riverside Public Library, Reference Section.

What is disaster preparedness?

Disaster preparedness is the means of preparing for a disaster before it happens. Some ways of preparing would be storage of food, water, and medicine in the event you had to be on your own for three days, planning escape routes, and setting up out of area contacts. These are just a few of the things you can do.

What types of disasters occur in the Riverside area?

Riverside is most vulnerable to floods. However, we can have earthquakes, draughts, fires, winds, Africanized honey bees, fire ants and situations such as civil unrest, terrorism and energy shortages.

Where are the nearest bomb and fallout shelters?

Bomb and fallout shelters were the direct result of a fear of nuclear war in the 1950's and 60's. With the decline of the Cold War the need for these shelters has disappeared. The City has developed extensive emergency plans and resources to ensure a coordinated response to any disaster, including a terrorist event. The best thing to do is listen to the radio or television for any information such as the location of any shelter - if established, or the need to 'shelter-in-place.

What do you mean by 'shelter-in-place'?

Shelter-in-place is intended to keep you safe while remaining indoors. For other natural disaster you may be directed by local officials to go to a community shelter for safety purposes. However, the intent of a 'shelter-in-place? means selecting a small, interior room, with no or few windows and taking refuge there.

An above ground location is preferable because some chemicals are heavier than air, and may seep into basements even if the windows are closed. Large storage closets, utility rooms, pantries, copy and conference rooms without exterior windows work well. Use duct tape and plastic sheeting (heavier than food wrap) to seal all cracks around the door and any vents into the room. There is no need to seal off your entire home or office with duct tape and plastic sheeting.

It is important to remember that instructions to 'shelter-in-place? mean shelter for a few hours, not days or weeks. There is little danger that the room in which you are taking shelter will run out of oxygen and you will suffocate. Keep listening to your radio or television until you are told all is safe.

Should I buy a gas mask?

Biological and radiological agents, which are airborne, are vapors, not gasses so there's no need for a gas mask. Vapors immediately begin to dissipate once they are released. When you leave an area, the risk of being affected by a vapor diminishes. Gas masks were developed for soldiers who have to remain in a specific area - that's the big difference. You can leave an area and always leave the risk. Chemical gasses need to be delivered in large quantities in order to kill or cause injuries. If you smell a vapor or gas, remember to stay calm. If you panic you have a tendency to breathe faster and you will breathe more of the biological, radiological or chemical agent. Listen to local radio and television broadcasts for information if an airborne attack occurs.

Should I start storing food, water, medical supplies, clothing, etc.?

It makes good sense to store food, water and medical supplies as well as duct tape and plastic sheeting. Natural disasters can occur at any time, and the City encourages you to do all you can to be prepared for all types of hazards. Why not be ready?

What is the City of Riverside doing about terrorist attacks?

The City is involved in a multi-jurisdictional group whose responsibilities are to develop terrorism emergency response plans and training. The Police Department continually assesses threats to determine if they are credible. The City has been very pro-active in its terrorist response planning.

For Further Information Call:

City of Riverside Office of Emergency Management - (951) 320-8100

Building Safety Month-Disaster Preparedness

5/26/2021 (Permalink)

green back ground with white lettering disaster preparedness Natural disasters are increasing in severity and frequency. Advance planning supports a faster recovery in the aftermath of a disaster

WEEK FOUR // May 24–31, 2021

Below are some resources the International Code Council has to help you prepare your family and protect your home from natural disasters.

Natural disasters are increasing in severity and frequency. Advance planning for devastating events like hurricanes, floods, snowstorms, tornadoes, wildfires and earthquakes helps individuals and communities increase the health and safety of their population during a disaster, protects the local tax base, ensures continuity of essential services and supports a faster recovery in the aftermath of a disaster. 

Prepare Your Family

Here are a few tips to follow when preparing your family for any emergency.

  • Determine your risk. Identifying and understanding possible
    hazards and emergencies is the first step in preparing for natural disasters.
  • Consider incorporating a safe
    room in building plans and improvements. A safe room is a hardened structure specifically designed
    to meet FEMA criteria and provide near-absolute protection in extreme weather events, including tornadoes
    and hurricanes.
  • Sign up for your community’s warning system. The Emergency Alert System and National Oceanic and Atmospheric
    Administration Weather Radio also provide emergency alerts.
  • Develop a family disaster plan that
    includes a list of food and water supplies needed for each member of your family and supplies for your pets.
    Make copies of important documents like insurance policies, the deed to your home, and other personal
    papers, important phone numbers and a home inventory.
  • Store important documents in a waterproof container and create password-protected digital copies.
  • Review your evacuation route and emergency shelter locations
    with your family. Options for evacuation would include staying with friends and relatives, seeking
    commercial lodging or staying in a mass care facility operated by disaster relief groups in conjunction with
    local authorities.
  • Taking shelter is critical in times of disaster. Sheltering in
    place is appropriate when conditions require that you seek protection in your home, place of employment or
    other location where you are when disaster strikes.
  • Review your plan regularly. If you make changes that affect the information in your disaster plan, update it
    immediately.
  • Visit FEMA’s Prepareathon! to learn more about how to
    prepare for earthquakes, floods, hurricanes, tornadoes, wildfires and winter storms. Get Involved to help prepare your family and community.

Protect Your Home

The power of natural disasters can be overwhelming. While you can't necessarily stop them from happening, there are steps you can take to increase your home's chance of survival, even in the face of the worst that Mother Nature can dish out. Protecting your home can range from taking simple measures like protecting windows or elevating appliances, to more complete building retrofit measures. See Additional Information and Resources below for links to hazard-specific guidance on protecting your home.

Several lines of insurance are available to cover financial damage from various hazards. To learn more about protecting your home financially through insurance, see FLASH’s Homeowner’s Insurance Guide to Natural Disasters.

Flood insurance can be the difference between recovering and being financially devastated. Just one inch of water in a home can cost more than $25,000 in damages. The average flood insurance claims payment to homeowners was about $90,000 from the Baton Rouge floods in 2016 and $65,000 for Superstorm Sandy that struck the Northeast in 2012.

FEMA's Individual Assistance Program, during times of federally-declared disasters, can provide financial assistance for home repairs, rental assistance, and other needs in the U.S., but the average payouts are much smaller, on the order of $6,000 to $8,000 per household — why risk it? For more information on flood insurance, visit floodsmart.gov.

Three Types of Fire Damage That Affect Homeowners in Riverside

5/24/2021 (Permalink)

homes with yellow orange flames A fire is devastating, and when it occurs, an immediate response can prevent damage from spreading throughout your home.

Things to Take Care of After a Fire Damages Your Riverside Property

A fire is devastating, and when it occurs, an immediate response can prevent damage from spreading throughout your home. After a fire loss, you should assess the extent of the damage in the structures and contents of your home. It is also essential to learn if your insurance firm can compensate you for all the relevant destruction.

Fire damage in your Riverside home  can be of three types. All three kinds of destruction come with their issues, so it is crucial to understand what they are and how they can affect your property.

Flame damage

Various types of flame destruction can occur based on what caused the fire. For instance, an electrical fire can have a different effect on your house when compared to a fire caused by a naked flame like a match or candle. Improper restoration can cause unseen structural damage or hidden electrical problems. SERVPRO has expertise in restoring homes after any fire.

Smoke and soot damage

The destruction that soot causes is long-lasting and may hang around for weeks or months after extinguishing the fire. The smoke scent can linger on different structures in your house, including ceilings, walls, furniture, and flooring. Smoke turns into soot, and it may discolor surfaces in your home. Some smoke residues can cause some surfaces to corrode. Our technicians can wipe off light-colored painted surfaces, plastic surfaces, tops of furniture with finished surfaces, Formica countertops and fiberglass surfaces properly to eliminate residues. We can also use air scrubbers to remove the smoke scent from your home.

3rd party damage

house fire brings about other vulnerabilities and problems. For instance, the water that firefighters used to extinguish the flames can get absorbed in the drywall, flooring, and carpeting. Our SERVPRO technicians can use infrared cameras to check for hidden moisture and then dry the affected areas. Firefighters often use dry chemicals like sodium bicarbonate, monoammonium phosphate, or potassium bicarbonate to extinguish fires. These can leave a corrosive powder on the affected areas. We can clean up the powder quickly to prevent further damage.

After a fire loss, SERVPRO of West Riverside City is ready to help you deal with it. We can work with you to restore your property to normal quickly. Call us today at (951) 351-8033.

Preparing Homes and Communities for the 2021 Wildfire Season

5/19/2021 (Permalink)

ground covered in leaves with blue rake scooping them into black trash bag Tip from StateFarm and NFPA: Raking and removing pine needles and dry leaves within a minimum of 3 to 5 feet of a home’s foundation.

The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) and State Farm are helping communities take steps toward safety with Last year, 58,950 wildfires burned over 10.2 million acres of land in the United States, resulting in loss of homes, business, and even lives.

Given that in-person gatherings are limited or on-hold in many places, this year’s Prep Day is focused on what residents can do on and around their home to help protect against the threat of wildfires.

Here are tips from StateFarm and NFPA.

 To create defensible space and reduce your risk:

  • Raking and removing pine needles and dry leaves within a minimum of 3 to 5 feet of a home’s foundation. As time permits, continue up to a 30-foot distance around the home. Dispose of collected debris in appropriate trash receptacles.
  • Cleaning pine needles from roof and gutters and paying attention to maintaining the home ignition zone.
  • Getting out your measuring tape and seeing how close wood piles are located to the home. If closer than 30 feet, they need to be relocated and moved at least 30’ away from structures.
  • Sweeping porches and decks clearing them of leaves and pine needles. Raking under decks, porches, sheds and play structures.
  • Removing items stored under decks and porches and relocating them to a storage shed, garage, or basement. Gasoline cans and portable propane tanks should never be stored indoors and should be located away from the home.
  • Posting and sharing Facebook and Twitter messages with tips and best practices with others in your community. (See sample posts from NFPA here.)

State Farm also recommends policyholders:

  • Review your insurance policy to make sure you’re covered in the event of a wildfire
  • Create a home inventory to assist in the claims process
  • Create a disaster preparedness plan that includes your pets and animals

For more resources and information about national Wildfire Community Preparedness Day including videos and tip sheets, visit www.wildfireprepday.org.

Protect Yourself Against Water Flooding in Your Riverside Home

5/18/2021 (Permalink)

white water heater surrounded by water on concrete floor Check appliances such as washers, dishwashers, water heaters regularly and replace water lines when needed.

You can’t prevent every catastrophe that might come along, but we pulled together a few solid tips to protect yourself against water flooding in your home. Take a moment to check these out to minimize your flooding risk.

Clean your downspouts and gutters

With the many trees and windy conditions Riverside residents should add this task to their list.  Make sure to clean out your gutters at least once every six months or more often if you have a lot of trees near your Riverside home. When water collects in the gutters it can cause damage to your roof and the gutters themselves. Check to ensure water is running off properly and draining away from your house. Downspouts that aren’t clean can cause damage to walls and even your foundation. At SERVPRO of Riverside City, we see this issue surprisingly often. Clean those gutters and spouts!

Switch off the mains

If you are going on vacation or you are going to be away for a length of time, switch the water off at the main. This will stop any dripping or other water issues while you are away. You wouldn’t want to come home to water rushing out your front door to greet you! Unfortunately, our parched ground often absorbs the water so at first you may not even know you have a leak but at some point, the ground becomes saturated and then you have a big mess on your hands! If you have a drip system or sprinkler system, it may make sense to ask a neighbor, house sitter or your landscaper to turn these on and off manually. There are some systems you can control from your phone to water your landscaping too!

Keep your garden in check

While we’re on the topic of landscaping, trees and shrubs can cause damage to your pipes from the roots wrapping around the pipes. Keep your garden maintained and avoid planting large plants near piping if at all possible.

Take care of those small leaks immediately

Found a little leak? It may seem like a harmless drip, but a small leak can become a big water damage problem if not dealt with as soon as possible. Even tiny drips can cause mildew and mold in your home and even lead to structural damage and dry rot over an extended period of time. If you fix the leaks as they occur, you have less likelihood of the small issue becoming a huge problem later. If you have a sudden spike in your water bill, make sure you investigate for underground water leaks as well.

Check the appliances

Most people think toilets are the cause of most home floods but don’t forget about your appliances! Monitor appliances for leaks and replace any cracked and brittle piping. Things like a dishwasher or washing machine can flood your house out quickly if the appliance is not maintained adequately.

Flood damage in our homes is something most of us experience at some point in our lives. It could be caused by something as simple as an overflowing bathtub or something more serious such as a burst pipe or sewerage pipe rupture.

Flood damages to your home can range from minor to severe and dealing with the issue can be overwhelming. While some water issues cannot be foreseen, there are a few things you can do to prevent flood damages to your home from factors you have some control over.

If you experience flooding in your home, immediately call the water damage experts!

Get the help you need from SERVPRO of West Riverside City

951-351-8033 

Answered: Your Most Burning Questions About Fire Damage in Riverside

4/21/2021 (Permalink)

red and orange flames SERVPRO of West Riverside City has the proper training and tools to return a home to preloss condition.

Odor Removal in Your Riverside Home 

While there are many lingering effects after a fire loss incident in Riverside homes that property owners can overcome with elbow grease and the right focused cleaning efforts, there are other symptoms that ensure that returning a house to preloss condition is a significant challenge. Odor damages, for example, can spread far beyond an ignition source to affect multiple areas of a home, even rooms otherwise unaffected by the disaster. Reducing or eliminating the presence of these harsh scents often requires a higher grade of cleaning agent and units designed for deodorization in the restoration industry. 

When overcoming fire damages in Riverside homes like lingering odors, SERVPRO professionals like ours must utilize multiple pieces of equipment. The best approach for professional deodorization gets determined by the severity of the condition, the affected materials, and the timeline to protect the rest of the household. While there are multiple units and approaches available to our professionals, the most commonly used by our team are: 

  • Hydroxyl Generators 
  • These machines utilize both an onboard HEPA filtering system and produce free radicals to break down the molecular structure of foul odors on contact. These units are safe to use around people, pets, and softer materials. 

  • Ozone Machines 
  • These units (and the larger chambers at SERVPRO facilities) produce a gas comprised of three oxygen atoms. These irregular compounds bond with odor molecules to neutralize them. This practice is not safe to use around humans and pets. 

  • Thermal Foggers 
  • As you might expect from the name, thermal foggers generate heat which vaporizes a compound the fogger can use. In these applications, the fogging solution is a highly effective deodorization agent. This practice is ideal for open areas and softer materials. 

  • Material Removal/Cleaning
  • Cleaning can help to noticeably reduce the presence of harsh odors in a fire-damaged area of your home. It is always the last resort of our SERVPRO professionals to allow for material removal and later replacement, and this decision only gets made with areas too severely damaged to preserve. 

    While there are some aspects of fire damage that homeowners can address on their own when first responders leave the scene, symptoms like odors pose a much more challenging obstacle to overcome.

    Let our SERVPRO of Riverside team help you make it “Like it never even happened.”

    Give us a call at (951) 351-8033.